Wednesday, April 24, 2013

The Things Authors Do (That Don't Involve Writing)


When I first started writing several years ago, it was the ONLY thing I did in regards to developing a possible career path as a published author. Of course I read, I researched writing craft, I put my butt in a chair and drafted, revised and edited. But now that I am a soon to be published author, the list of non-writing things is getting long:
  • Develop a blog (which includes learning how to design and market--enormous feats for someone who didn't get a degree in computer design or marketing)
  • Get a Twitter account (and develop a following)
  • Get on Goodreads (as a reader first and then as an author)
  • Work Facebook (first as a reader/writer and then get an Author Page)
  • Get a website (and write crazy amounts of content for it so that people will actually spend time there)
  • Join a group blog (which requires even more blogging). I am joining the OneFour Kidlit group blog, meant for authors debuting in 2014. I should really be in  the Lucky 13's, but they are full. I guess they couldn't foresee that a person could get a book deal at such break-neck speed!
  • Organize a marketing plan involving such things as book signings, school visits, blog tours, etc.
  • More stuff that I can't even wrap my head around now.
My question is this: How am I supposed to have time to sit around the beach, intermittently writing and napping? (Which is how I pictured my author life to be).





What else have I missed? What other stuff (that I'm not qualified for) should I be doing as a debut author?

16 comments:

  1. It's so overwhelming, isn't it? Except then it just becomes our new normal and we get used to it!

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  2. Every time I go to a writers conference and think of all the things I'm NOT doing, I kind of break down and don't do anything for awhile. I'm just trying to do what I can, when I can. I'll get there (or at least that's what I keep telling myself) haha :)

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  3. Wait, being a writer isn't a life of solitude, either on a beach or a mountain cabin? There goes that dream.....

    It's crazy how much is expected of authors.

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  4. Yeah, no kidding. Being an author is so much more work than they make it out to be in the movies. Still, I wouldn't have it any other way.

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  5. I know, it's crazy and can consume all your time if you let it...but I can see you are doing an excellent job!

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  6. I think we should have a retreat at the beach every year and intermittently write and nap and pretend that is what our life is actually all about. Seriously. Let's make this happen.

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  7. As far as the beach...hmm...wifi...idk. Just put a picture of a beach on your desk and take a few minutes a day to imagine, lol.

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  8. "This is the list that never ends. Yes, it goes on and on, my friend..."

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  9. Hmmm, I suppose I will have to get a Facebook page for the first time then, but there's still a part of me that's reluctant to do so. I spend so much time online already, and I'd hate to give up naptime for Facebook. :) I like naps. I don't like the beach though. I'm afraid that I'll get stung by a jellyfish if I go in the water or get bitten by a crab if I lie down on the beach.

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  10. I'll give you some advice. Only do the things that you love and enjoy. Trying to do all the social media that you don't like is overwhelming and unsatisfying to those readers who try to connect with you there. Select a few that you like and make sure that it always stays FUN. I'm constantly re-evaluating things because I'm finding that some stuff that used to be fun for me isn't anymore--that and it seems like my hours are only 35 minutes long these days. What is going on? :)

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  11. But if you want to be a writer, you've got to do these things. I just want my bed.

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  12. that is a long list indeed And to be honest, those are the things that intimidate me and overwhelm me most about being in the writing world. I'm hoping to watch how you and Peggy and other published writers handle it and learn from your examples.

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  13. Nice new page design! Very cool. Keep it up girl!

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  14. Just found your blog by way of another writing blog. Very helpful advice for writers.

    The time-ratio I read about for writers: before you publish a book, 80% of your time should go toward writing and 20% toward media stuff (blogging, etc.). After the book is out, writing is now at 20% and media stuff at 80. That may be good in theory, but hard to practice all the time. I find the media stuff more stressful than actually researching and writing.

    Good blog.
    WB

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