Monday, September 23, 2013

Time to Query

I am of the school of thought that there are good times of year and not so good times of year to query. I've blogged about this before, as have many others, but here's a little B-Word Bulleted Breakdown on the matter:

Not So Good Months to Query:
  • January- because 1) everyone (and their mother) is waiting for agents to get back from holiday breaks to query, 2) because a lot of those agents will be going out on submission with their clients during this month, and 3) because of a couple big conferences which many agents attend. 
  • July- because of family vacations and heat waves.
  • August- because its still too hot and school is starting soon and one last vacation must be taken before getting back to the grind. 
  • December- because of all the unpolished NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month where hundreds of thousands of writers write complete novels) submissions streaming in and also because the holidays.
 Good Months to Query:
  • February- because the agents may have more time to catch up on their slush piles after some distance from the holidays.
  • September- because there's something about the freshness in the air, kids settling down and going back to school, and adults getting down to business, as evidenced by this post of my agent, Sarah Davies: Pounding of the Hooves. So if you're thinking of pulling the trigger on querying, DO IT! NOW!
  • November-Most everyone is so busy working on their new, shiny NaNoWriMo project that they have no time for querying and therefore agents might have a slightly less gargantuan slush pile.
    DISCLAIMER: I could be 100% totally wrong on all of this.  I am only speaking from my own personal experience. Your best bet is to research your favorite agents individually and find out what they are doing and when.

    Goodbye.

    What's your two cents?


19 comments:

  1. I think you're pretty spot on, though I queried in August and got an agent then. I guess it all depends on timing, which can vary for each agent. I definitely agree about December, though, especially with all the unpolished NaNoWriMo projects!

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  2. i've heard December and the end of the summer weren't great times. I'll have to keep this in mind next time i query.

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  3. This sounds about right. Thanks for the tips.

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  4. Summer is generally a slow time for the publishing industry over all.

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  5. Your breakdown is consistent with what I've always heard.

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  6. This sounds about right. Query when you're ready and the timing is good for agents. Thanks!

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  7. Yeah, I've heard that too. Query seasons also seem to coincide with conference requests, it seems. Just my opinion though.
    Edge of Your Seat Romance

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  8. Great post! May is usually chaotic, too, due to conference season.

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  9. I agree 100% with your stats. There are times that just aren't good. But then sometimes if you hit it right before the agent gets overwhelmed with a thousand queries. Tomorrow is a big day on Twitter. If you use the hashtag #MSWL you can see what agents are actively seeking!

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  10. Thank you so much for this helpful information. I never knew there were certain times to query and not to. It explains my lack of query responses.

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  11. I'm totally planning on querying my new book next month, then taking December and January off for those exact reasons!

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  12. I meant November. I'm already thinking it's October :p

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  13. I had my best luck in the Fall, especially around September.

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  14. You know, this is actually quite spot on! I noticed much faster and more responses to queries during the "good time to query" list, not so much - or no answer at all - during the "not so good months." I'd hate to be an agent in December. :)

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  15. Very creative. Makes sense to me, though. I'll be querying next week so I guess I fall somewhere between worst and best times... 'okay times' sounds good.

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  16. Nice post, Thanks for your very useful Information, I will bookmark for next reference

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