Monday, December 30, 2013

2014, You Will Be My Killer Year!


Yes, 2014, I'm talking to you! Can you hear me? You and I are going to kill it!  It's going to be Big, totally Ballin', completely Beautiful, and lots of other B-Words. 

2014 is my debut year as an author!
(and maybe the year I get a Boob job)
[see how I wrote this Boob part so small that it's less noticeable/controversial/outrageous]
And in honor of this climactic year, I would like to announce my theme: 
(yes, I have a theme) 

“Jessie With A Shot At the Night” 
*Based on The Killers song
 I’ve always been a dreamer. From a very early age I began setting goals to achieve my dreams. Some panned out (I made it to college by the beach) and some didn't (I never starred on my own Disney show called "Jessie"--someone else did that for me...15 years later!)

But here's the thing: Sometimes I get to feelin' like a washed-up dreamer, a mom-jeans-wearing nobody, a dime-a-dozen-two-bit lawyer, a carpooling hack, a burnt-dinner-wifey, a church-going-cut-out, a closed-garage-door-neighbor, and worse.

When what I really want to feel like is an artist with a bright future, a skinny-jeans-wearing somebody, a zealous advocate for good, a movin-and-shakin'-mama, a rockstar wifey, an impassioned believer, an opened-door-friend and...a girl with a shot at the night.

There are so many schools of thought when it comes to goal setting vs. new year resolutions vs. daily systems, etc. I recently read some very interesting information about unrealistic goalsApparently, setting an unreasonably large goal is an adrenaline infusion that provides the endurance to overcome the inevitable trials and tribulations that go along with any goal. I found this idea fascinating.
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5 ‘Easy’ Steps for Making Your Unrealistic Goal a Reality

iStock 000020646047XSmallWith the book tour just about wrapped up, it’s great to be sitting at my own desk in my own house writing a blog post again.
The tour has been amazing. So many roads, people, stories, hotels and cities, and so many delicious meals (especially once I hit the west coast). There are still a few events left, including Charlotte, Raleigh, and my hometown of Asheville this Thursday, but these and the remaining dates in Raleigh and Atlanta (maybe) are short drives away. The hard part — all 11,000 miles of it in my Hyundai Elantra — is over. The goal, achieved.
Yes, this self-supported book tour was like any other goal. It started as a speck of an idea that hit me on a run one day, a ridiculous and unrealistic idea. Then the day of intense, excited research to answer the “Is this possible?” question — knowing that no matter what the facts were, I’d somehow bend them into the shape of “Yes.” Finally, going public with it and creating the accountability. At which point it became real … then the rest was just details.
I’ve got plans for a book tour wrap-up post with photos, links, stories, maybe even a recording of my talk … but this is not that post.
My talk each night focused on three topics: running, the plant-based diet, and setting big freaking scary goals. Far more than the other two topics, the ones I thought were a safe bet, it was the talk of goals that people really cared about.
And so with this post I want to share, in a nutshell, what I said about goals while on tour. It’s exactly what I’ve done with just about every goal I’ve accomplished, from qualifying for Boston to the 100-miler to the book tour itself. The steps are obvious, I think, but important enough that they’re worth hearing from as many angles as you can.

1. Think really big.

If I may, an excerpt from Tim Ferriss’s 4-Hour Workweek, which perfectly sums up “thinking big”:
Ninety-nine percent of the people in the world are convinced they are incapable of achieving great things, so they aim for mediocre. The level of competition is thus fiercest for “realistic” goals, paradoxically making them the most time- and energy-consuming …
If you are insecure, guess what? The rest of the world is, too. Do not overestimate the competition and underestimate yourself. You are better than you think.
Unreasonable and unrealistic goals are easier to achieve for yet another reason. Having an unreasonably large goal is an adrenaline infusion that provides the endurance to overcome the inevitable trials and tribulations that go along with any goal. Realistic goals, goals restricted to the average ambition level, are uninspiring and will only fuel you through the first or second problem, at which point you throw in the towel. If the potential payoff is mediocre or average, so is your effort.
The fishing is best where the fewest go, and the collective insecurity of the world makes it easy for people to hit home runs while everyone else is aiming for base hits.
- See more at: http://www.nomeatathlete.com/big-goals-easy-steps/#sthash.9nO6IX7u.dpuf

5 ‘Easy’ Steps for Making Your Unrealistic Goal a Reality

iStock 000020646047XSmallWith the book tour just about wrapped up, it’s great to be sitting at my own desk in my own house writing a blog post again.
The tour has been amazing. So many roads, people, stories, hotels and cities, and so many delicious meals (especially once I hit the west coast). There are still a few events left, including Charlotte, Raleigh, and my hometown of Asheville this Thursday, but these and the remaining dates in Raleigh and Atlanta (maybe) are short drives away. The hard part — all 11,000 miles of it in my Hyundai Elantra — is over. The goal, achieved.
Yes, this self-supported book tour was like any other goal. It started as a speck of an idea that hit me on a run one day, a ridiculous and unrealistic idea. Then the day of intense, excited research to answer the “Is this possible?” question — knowing that no matter what the facts were, I’d somehow bend them into the shape of “Yes.” Finally, going public with it and creating the accountability. At which point it became real … then the rest was just details.
I’ve got plans for a book tour wrap-up post with photos, links, stories, maybe even a recording of my talk … but this is not that post.
My talk each night focused on three topics: running, the plant-based diet, and setting big freaking scary goals. Far more than the other two topics, the ones I thought were a safe bet, it was the talk of goals that people really cared about.
And so with this post I want to share, in a nutshell, what I said about goals while on tour. It’s exactly what I’ve done with just about every goal I’ve accomplished, from qualifying for Boston to the 100-miler to the book tour itself. The steps are obvious, I think, but important enough that they’re worth hearing from as many angles as you can.

1. Think really big.

If I may, an excerpt from Tim Ferriss’s 4-Hour Workweek, which perfectly sums up “thinking big”:
Ninety-nine percent of the people in the world are convinced they are incapable of achieving great things, so they aim for mediocre. The level of competition is thus fiercest for “realistic” goals, paradoxically making them the most time- and energy-consuming …
If you are insecure, guess what? The rest of the world is, too. Do not overestimate the competition and underestimate yourself. You are better than you think.
Unreasonable and unrealistic goals are easier to achieve for yet another reason. Having an unreasonably large goal is an adrenaline infusion that provides the endurance to overcome the inevitable trials and tribulations that go along with any goal. Realistic goals, goals restricted to the average ambition level, are uninspiring and will only fuel you through the first or second problem, at which point you throw in the towel. If the potential payoff is mediocre or average, so is your effort.
The fishing is best where the fewest go, and the collective insecurity of the world makes it easy for people to hit home runs while everyone else is aiming for base hits.
- See more at: http://www.nomeatathlete.com/big-goals-easy-steps/#sthash.9nO6IX7u.dpuf

5 ‘Easy’ Steps for Making Your Unrealistic Goal a Reality

iStock 000020646047XSmallWith the book tour just about wrapped up, it’s great to be sitting at my own desk in my own house writing a blog post again.
The tour has been amazing. So many roads, people, stories, hotels and cities, and so many delicious meals (especially once I hit the west coast). There are still a few events left, including Charlotte, Raleigh, and my hometown of Asheville this Thursday, but these and the remaining dates in Raleigh and Atlanta (maybe) are short drives away. The hard part — all 11,000 miles of it in my Hyundai Elantra — is over. The goal, achieved.
Yes, this self-supported book tour was like any other goal. It started as a speck of an idea that hit me on a run one day, a ridiculous and unrealistic idea. Then the day of intense, excited research to answer the “Is this possible?” question — knowing that no matter what the facts were, I’d somehow bend them into the shape of “Yes.” Finally, going public with it and creating the accountability. At which point it became real … then the rest was just details.
I’ve got plans for a book tour wrap-up post with photos, links, stories, maybe even a recording of my talk … but this is not that post.
My talk each night focused on three topics: running, the plant-based diet, and setting big freaking scary goals. Far more than the other two topics, the ones I thought were a safe bet, it was the talk of goals that people really cared about.
And so with this post I want to share, in a nutshell, what I said about goals while on tour. It’s exactly what I’ve done with just about every goal I’ve accomplished, from qualifying for Boston to the 100-miler to the book tour itself. The steps are obvious, I think, but important enough that they’re worth hearing from as many angles as you can.

1. Think really big.

If I may, an excerpt from Tim Ferriss’s 4-Hour Workweek, which perfectly sums up “thinking big”:
Ninety-nine percent of the people in the world are convinced they are incapable of achieving great things, so they aim for mediocre. The level of competition is thus fiercest for “realistic” goals, paradoxically making them the most time- and energy-consuming …
If you are insecure, guess what? The rest of the world is, too. Do not overestimate the competition and underestimate yourself. You are better than you think.
Unreasonable and unrealistic goals are easier to achieve for yet another reason. Having an unreasonably large goal is an adrenaline infusion that provides the endurance to overcome the inevitable trials and tribulations that go along with any goal. Realistic goals, goals restricted to the average ambition level, are uninspiring and will only fuel you through the first or second problem, at which point you throw in the towel. If the potential payoff is mediocre or average, so is your effort.
The fishing is best where the fewest go, and the collective insecurity of the world makes it easy for people to hit home runs while everyone else is aiming for base hits.
- See more at: http://www.nomeatathlete.com/big-goals-easy-steps/#sthash.9nO6IX7u.dpuf

So as for 2014, here's my flat-out unrealistic, crazy-stupid, and downright ridiculous goals:
  • I will Blog EVERY DAY (excluding weekends and holidays). I have some really crazy-stupid ideas of how I am going to do this. Stay tuned—I promise to be shocking, controversial, and borderline inappropriate (as usual). I am going to do this through the use of three B-words: Bullet points, Brevity, and Bridget Jones. You’re welcome. 
  • I will take a shot at the night...and get Brandon Flowers and The Killers to appear at my book launch for KILLING RUBY ROSE. I told you these goals were going to be crazy-stupid. But just so you know, Brandon Flowers is from Las Vegas (we even went to the same high school--he was a freshman when I was a senior--go Chaparral Cowboys!), and the band is crazy-awesome, and this goal is not outside the realm of possibility. After you get done rolling your eyes…(done yet?)…make sure that you clear your calendar to come to Las Vegas on September 16. 
  • I will embark on trips to New York City, Chicago, Orlando, Seattle, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Los Angeles (and maybe a few other cities) for various literary reasons: to attend book expos/library conventions, writing confrences, to meet my publishing team, party with my agent, tour with my publishing sisters at Skyscape/Amazon Children’s Publishing.
  • I will write/revise and sell another Book. Plain and simple. 
These are the Biggies. I will set smaller goals in order to achieve these downright ridiculous goals. But in honor of my goal of Brevity, I’ll end here. You got any crazy-stupid goals for 2014?

Love,
Jessie With a Shot At The Night

17 comments:

  1. If you get The Killers to come that would be FREAKING AMAZING! I LOVE THEM! If anyone could do something huge like that you could. You're awesome and I'm SO excited for you! I'll try my hardest to get to Las Vegas. I really really want to be there. And I'm with you on selling another book this year. Bring it on 2014!

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  2. Your posts are always so full of awesome. I'll be looking forward to them in 2014! My goals are all super mundane, but a new year is full of possibilities. Happy New Year!

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  3. So excited to buy your book and see the KILLERS on September 16th (my birthday!) How can they NOT come, especially with a title like KILLING Ruby Rose? I have no doubt you'll KILL it this year, Jessie!

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    1. Amelia, it's your birthday on 9/16? That is serendipitous! We will partay! And yes, the whole KILLING/KILLERS thing has to be a sign from heaven, right ;). I'm going to hell...

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  4. I totally read the really small part. I've had several friends who have committed and loved it. Also, I love your big goals. I'm teetering back and forth between going big and going safe. Can't decide. I can't wait to see what this year has in store for you, but regardless it will be killer!

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  5. You had me at BOOBS. (See how I didn't write it small there?) ;-) Love this post and your goals--go big or go home, right?!

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  6. You had me at The Killers. They are my favorite band ever of all time for realz and the BEST concert I ever went to was The Killers and Brandon Flowers is my BBBBF (best band brandon boy friend) and I will SO be there in Vegas if they play at your launch. Also, I LOVE your outrageous goals. Let's make 2014 ROCK!

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  7. I love your tenacious down right go getter goals!! Set it high. Why not??? Don't let anyone say you can't. Plus...I did see the boobs. Hahahaha... Too funny. Go get 'em tiger (singing eye of the tiger)

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  8. I would like to come hang with you and The Killers (b/c who does not LOVE them) for your book launch ;-)

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  9. I think I'm just going to come to your book launch regardless, mainly to see if you got the boobs. Las Vegas is kind of my neighbor, really.

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  10. Kens bday is the 16th too so we will keep that date open (after he's done golfing that is)

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  11. See Jessie, this is why we love the B out of you: Big dreams, Big heart, and someday soon Big boobs. Can't wait to cheer you on in a Big way all through your Big year! Love you B-girl!

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  12. I love your outrageous goals! I hope every single one of them happens. I can't wait to see it all!

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  13. I love all this. Can't wait for sept 16th!

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  14. GO BIG OR GO HOME. Absolutely, girl. :) I love your strategy.

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  15. Those are crazy AMAZING goals!! You inspire me :D I think you can totally do The Killer's thing. If anyone can, you can :)

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  16. This sounds great! I'm sure you'll be awesome! Good luck with all of your goals for 2014. I can't wait to read your book! :)

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